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Soil Microbes – The Living Organisms Born To Give

Sepixa - Living OrganismsThe ground upon which we grow our food, is perceived in many ways. There are those who were born to view the earth as nothing more than a tool to be utilized for survival, sustainment and human proliferation. Existing without contemplation of their personal or collective impact. Then there are those of us who were born with the innate desire to protect her. From birth, our need to care for our planet has been close to instinctual. Like the body of a plant which grows to nourish, only to give itself back to the soil for the betterment of its environment.

All human organisms occupying our earth have so very much in common with the microscopic organisms living in the soils that help us produce our food. There are soil microbes which “take” and give nothing back to their host […]

By |March 17th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Soil Microbes – The Living Organisms Born To Give

Is True Sustainable Agriculture Possible On A Large Scale?

Sustainable FarmingThe simple truth is that true sustainable farming and regenerative agriculture begins with soil. The soil is a complex and often very simple media. Basic fertilization, the addition of nutrients or cover crops may not address everything the soil needs. The question then becomes, can we give more so that our land gives more back to us? Is it possible to go from reacting to what is constantly thrown at us and find a better position with issues such as crop yields, input costs, soil health and even, plant health. Many of us who grow believe that to go from a “reactive” state to a “pro active” state you must refine your issues from the ground up. 

So what is the soil missing to achieve sustainability? The answer is plain and simply soil life.

We believe plants must be […]

By |March 7th, 2016|Blog|Comments Off on Is True Sustainable Agriculture Possible On A Large Scale?

Acres Magazine – Shedding New Light on Microbial Inoculation

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Back in 1995, Dr. Robert Bruck, a plant pathologist at North Carolina State University, got an unexpected knock on his office door.

“There was this short, very distinguished looking gentleman with a white beard and an Australian accent,” says Bruck. “He said ‘good day, mate, can I have a few minutes of your time?’” The man was Dr. Frank McKenna, a soil microbiologist from Murdoch University in Western Australia. McKenna explained to Bruck that decades earlier he had been commissioned by the Australian government to investigate the possibility of using beneficial soil organisms to combat plant diseases and, as a result of his research, had developed a microbial inoculant that was highly effective at promoting plant vigor and soil health in a range of settings. He was looking […]

By |August 26th, 2015|Press|Comments Off on Acres Magazine – Shedding New Light on Microbial Inoculation